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Happiness & Hormones

Did you know you can control your happiness? Being unhappy is real, but we can get stuck there. You can intentionally find the bright spot and actually enjoy your life!


“So, what do I do?” you ask. It's all in your head! Make use of the chemicals, hormones, and neurotransmitters right there already in you, your amazing brain.


These natural substances work together to help out with certain biological & physiological processes. Their other function? They regulate our moods.


When you can learn how to regulate and adjust them naturally!



What Are These Amazing Happy Chemicals?

Our brain stimulates certain glands to release dozens of different chemicals. They’re sent out into the bloodstream and get to where they need to go.


These chemicals, aka hormones, are involved in various bodily processes. There’s a hormone for managing digestion, heart rate, and reproduction. Basically, anything your body does is regulated by one hormone or another.


They also have the ability to make us feel joy, sadness, hunger, or pumped up with energy. They’re usually referred to as ‘feel-good’ or ‘happy’ hormones.


These chemicals fluctuate throughout the day. This is why you feel lethargic mid-afternoon or excited for an upcoming party you’re attending.


These are your main happy chemicals :).

  • Dopamine

  • Endorphins

  • Oxytocin

  • Serotonin

I Want More!

The great thing about these happy chemicals is we have power over them. We can either increase or decrease how much of them are released through the choices we make each day.


Find Time To Exercise

Exercising has so many health benefits. The most important benefit is that it affects our emotional and mental well-being.


Studies show that when you exercise for at least 20 minutes, your body releases endorphins. The science behind it is that they induce a sense of euphoria.


Have you ever heard of the ‘runner’s high?’ Guess who’s behind that? That’s right, endorphins!


Endorphins are also popular among athletes because they can block pain signals. They do this by binding to opioid receptors in the central nervous system. As a result, your feeling of pain is considerably reduced.